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December 12, 2007
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USS Concorde NCC-1776 Refit by Phaeton99 USS Concorde NCC-1776 Refit by Phaeton99
One of several Star Trek designs I may eventually make available in PDF format.

Schematic illustration of the Constitution Class USS Concorde (NCC-1776) after its 2265 refit and as it appeared overall until its retirement in 2356. Note the expanded bridge deck and docking facilities on Deck 2.

USS CONCORDE (NCC-1776) was one of the final series of original CONSTITUTION Class starships commissioned by Starfleet, launched in 2252 representing the final, refined form of the classic line, and would be among the first to undergo the extensive program of refitting begun in the year 2265.

In all, the USS CONCORDE would remain in active fleet service for over a century before finally being decommissioned in 2356. Its standard was transferred to a newly commissioned SOVEREIGN Class starship (NCC-81776) in 2372.

The "century ship" was far from famous in its early career: its first decade of service, solid and reliable, but obscure. Yet over its lifetime, the fame of the USS CONCORDE swelled, its reputation as "the ship that always comes home" grew over decades of perilous missions overcome with not a crewman lost (not wholly accurate, but such losses were rare), emergence from hostile encounters against all odds, and unexpected homecomings after going missing and all hope for its survival had perished. By the end of its 104 years of service, the name CONCORDE had become as illustrious as ENTERPRISE, yet had accomplished this renown with a single ship, rather than a series of namesakes, and the USS CONCORDE holds the record as eldest of its class to remain in continuous active service. Whereas the USS ENTERPRISE was renowned for valor, USS CONCORDE was famed for its steadfast reliability.

After its retirement, the USS CONCORDE was inducted into the Fleet Museum, taking its place moored beside the last of the unrefit CONSTITUTION Class vessels, the USS EAGLE.

(Download for full resolution)

Digital Illustration, Adobe illustrator.


TOS Version


Deck 2 Development
_________
"Star Trek" is a Registered Trademark of CBS Studios Inc

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:iconjrl3001:
jrl3001 Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2010   General Artist
Fantastic plans! I love how much detail there is and the quality of your work is perfect!

My only beef is your back story for the ship. You state Concorde was refit in 2265, yet it is a well known fact that Enterprise, first of the Constitutions to receive this refit did not put into the yards until somewhere around 2270
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:iconchroniclesofman:
ChroniclesofMan Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Fantastic work. I am quite a fan of the modifications you made to the bridge component, especially the removal of what I considered an oddly placed docking ring and the addition of a much needed conference room.

Also your execution of the original design brings to life all of the detail of the ship as well as emphasizes some details that weren't as prevalent in movie models, diagrams, etc.

Kudos.
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:iconphaeton99:
Phaeton99 Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
In all honesty, I make few claims about the details of the ship schematics beyond the upper deck redesigns.

The credited original source of the base illustrations was Tobias Weimann (whose bridge plans served as a model for some of my concepts as well) — granted, those base illustrations appear to be scanned from published sources like Mr.Scotts' Guide to the Enterprise and such, and auto-traced as vector art.

Despite the expedient move to simply modify existing schematics to illustrate the upper deck concepts, rather than lay out the plans from scratch, I thoroughly reworked much of the detail to clean up artifacts of scanning and vector conversion, as well as correct some serious scale and proportion problems evident even in the original source material. In the end, I practically rebuilt the 90% of the illustrations anyway — so much for expediency — and added some details that I though missing, tweaking the line-weights for additional emphasis. the plans simply looked too empty compared to the refit version of the ship (and still do - I am inclined to re-imagine the whole thing just to enhance the visual interest).

The lesson learned: expediency tends to make more work in the end.

C'est la vie.
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